Fires and 2018 crops

We put the wrong link in our last newsletter.. To see the blog post on classifying cannabis click the link below:

Greenhouse, Hoop House, Light Dep (How to Classify Cannabis)

 

Every Summer the images of wildfires burning across the U.S. are becoming much more common. There is no question the fires are happening more frequently in the Western U.S.

In total, 386 larger wildfires have burned recently, that required some coordinated response under a Type l, ll, or lll interagency management system. Hazardous air quality has left workers to wear respiratory masks while taking down harvests. Yet work continues to go on.

Will this affect Washington’s outdoor crops?

With ash and smoke particles fumigating the air, one can only wonder how crops will grow and smell at the end of harvest. Once flowering, will crops take on the smokey smell?

One outdoor/greenhouse farm representative stated: “Last year we had fires and it didn’t seem to affect our light dep in the taste or quality ”. In reference to what he thought would happen to this years crop he added: “I’m not sure but we are hoping for the best.”.

California Fires and crops

California last October 2017 had the some of the states worst fires in its history. As well as one of the biggest crops of cannabis in the history of the state since its legalization. There’s even an argument that smoke, ash and the byproduct of fire burning (CO2) may even help with crop growth and health. That may be a stretch but I do believe that the smoke at this time is not much of an issue to the plant itself. It will effect the farmer and the workers far more.

The Consensus

In talking with farmers from Washington and California, the taste and smell of their cannabis was not affected by smoke last year or this year. Fires are always a concern but as long as farms are out of harms way, all should be fine.

The fires are devastating and we wish for the safety and well being to all those affected. As long as there is no physical harm done concerning the fires, I believe that the October outdoor crops should be fine. At least that is my hope and the hope of many in this business.

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